Betatakin Pueblo ruins in the Navajo National Monument

Like many such Indian ruin sites in Northern Arizona, Betatakin survives in its semi-preserved state from the late 1200's due to the fact that it was built within a natural rock enclave, protected from weather and erosion. It has 120 rooms in various staggered levels, and one kiva, or circular center. The major materials for construction were sandstone blocks held together with mud and mortar. Wooden poles were also used for special purpose construction elements. Modern archeology holds that these rooms were used for storage or agricultural products as well as habitation of the inhabitants. The society which built habitational centers like Betatakin is called the Anasazi, a present day Navajo term referring to the "old ones".

In a letter written in August, 1935, Ned Scott made the trek to Betatakin with a small group of men, among them locals who had intimate knowledge of Northern Arizona and its many unique features. They served as guides. He trekked with his Graflex 5 x 7 camera and his Ansco 8 x 10 view camera. Because Betatakin was not road-accessible, he used his Graflex to take a photographic study of the ruins.

Betatakin Pueblo ruins in the Navajo National Monument Betatakin Pueblo ruins in the Navajo National Monument Betatakin Pueblo ruins in the Navajo National Monument Betatakin Pueblo ruins in the Navajo National Monument Betatakin Pueblo ruins in the Navajo National Monument
Betatakin Pueblo ruins in the Navajo National Monument Betatakin Pueblo ruins in the Navajo National Monument Betatakin Pueblo ruins in the Navajo National Monument Betatakin Pueblo ruins in the Navajo National Monument